Chemicals of security concern

Across the world, terrorists and criminals have demonstrated an interest in using a range of chemicals to produce explosive or toxic devices to inflict harm. Historically, the chemicals required to manufacture these devices have been readily available as they are regularly used by individuals and businesses for legitimate purposes.

Across the world, terrorists and criminals have demonstrated an interest in using a range of chemicals to produce explosive or toxic devices to inflict harm. Historically, the chemicals required to manufacture these devices have been readily available as they are regularly used by individuals and businesses for legitimate purposes.

On 2 October 2008, the Commonwealth, States and Territories signed ‘An Agreement of Australia’s National Arrangements for the Management of Security Risks Associated with Chemicals’ with the objective of establishing an effective and collaborative national approach to the management of chemical security that seeks to prevent the use of chemicals for terrorist purposes.

Western Australia is working with the Australian and other State Governments to achieve a coordinated national approach to reduce threat posed by misuse of chemicals of security concern. It provides members on the National Counter Terrorism Committee (NCTC), the NCTC Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Capability Sub Committee, the National Government Advisory Group (NGAG) and the National Industry Reference Group.

Chemicals of Security Concern Campaign

The Australian and state governments in partnership with industry have developed a national awareness campaign and resources which can be found on the Chemicals of Security Concern website.

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National Code of Practice

There is a real risk of dangerous chemicals being used for terrorist purposes. Managing security risks across the chemical supply chain reduces this risk. Through a consultation process, the Australian Government has developed a National Code of Practice for businesses that handle products containing 11 chemicals that could be used to make homemade bombs. It does not apply to ammonium nitrate, which is regulated by state and territory governments. Businesses are encouraged to extend their application of the code to the remaining 84 chemicals of security concern.

The National Code of Practice is easily understood and can be effectively used by businesses. More information such as posters and fact sheets for manufacturers, importers, transporters, retailers, and the general public can be sort at National Code of Practice.

To report stolen or missing ammonium nitrate or explosives, any suspicious activity or security concerns contact the WA Police on 131 444 or the National Security Hotline on 1800 123 400 or via email.

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